The sick, and the world, need 'therapy' of love, Pope says in message

February 10, 2024 at 9:00 a.m.
Pope Francis speaks to a delegation from UNITALSI, an Italian Catholic association that organizes pilgrimages for the sick and for people with disabilities, during a meeting in the Paul VI Audience Hall at the Vatican Dec. 14, 2023. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
Pope Francis speaks to a delegation from UNITALSI, an Italian Catholic association that organizes pilgrimages for the sick and for people with disabilities, during a meeting in the Paul VI Audience Hall at the Vatican Dec. 14, 2023. (CNS photo/Vatican Media) (Vatican Media)

By CINDY WOODEN
Osv News

VATICAN CITY – The "first therapy" that must be offered to the sick, and to the world, is a dose of closeness, friendship and love, Pope Francis said in his message for the World Day of the Sick.

"We came into the world because someone welcomed us; we were made for love; and we are called to communion and fraternity," he wrote in his message for the annual observance Feb. 11, the feast of Our Lady of Lourdes.

A connection with other people "is what sustains us, above all at times of illness and vulnerability," the 87-year-old Pope wrote. "It is also the first therapy that we must all adopt in order to heal the diseases of the society in which we live."

The theme chosen for the 2024 observance is from the Book of Genesis, "It is not good that man should be alone." It was subtitled, "Healing the Sick by Healing Relationships."  

In his message, released Jan. 13, Pope Francis said Christians believe that "from the beginning, God, who is love, created us for communion and endowed us with an innate capacity to enter into relationship with others."

"We were created to be together, not alone," he wrote. "Precisely because this project of communion is so deeply rooted in the human heart, we see the experience of abandonment and solitude as something frightening, painful and even inhuman."

Pope Francis recalled the horrible pain of loneliness endured by those who were sick or in nursing homes during the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic and had no contact with their loved ones.

"I share too in the pain, suffering and isolation felt by those who, because of war and its tragic consequences, are left without support and assistance," he said. "War is the most terrible of social diseases, and it takes its greatest toll on those who are most vulnerable."

But even in rich countries at peace, he said, "old age and sickness are frequently experienced in solitude and, at times, even in abandonment."

When a culture emphasizes the individual, "exalts productivity at all costs, cultivates the myth of efficiency," he said, it "proves indifferent, even callous, when individuals no longer have the strength needed to keep pace."

"It then becomes a throwaway culture, in which 'persons are no longer seen as a paramount value to be cared for and respected, especially when they are poor or disabled, 'not yet useful' –like the unborn – or 'no longer needed' – like the elderly,'" he said, quoting his encyclical "Fratelli Tutti, on Fraternity and Social Friendship."

The Pope said such thinking is reflected in "certain political decisions that are not focused on the dignity of the human person and his or her needs, and do not always promote the strategies and resources needed to ensure that every human being enjoys the fundamental right to health and access to healthcare."

But, he said, the human dignity of sick and vulnerable also is abandoned when health care is seen simply as the provision of procedures and medication, rather than as caring for the whole person and involving the family in creating a network of support.

"Brothers and sisters," he wrote, "the first form of care needed in any illness is compassionate and loving closeness. To care for the sick thus means above all to care for their relationships, all of them: with God, with others – family members, friends, health care workers – with creation and with themselves."

Addressing those who are ill, Pope Francis said: "Do not be ashamed of your longing for closeness and tenderness! Do not conceal it, and never think that you are a burden on others."

And he called on all Catholics, "with the love for one another that Christ the Lord bestows on us in prayer, especially in the Eucharist," to "tend to the wounds of solitude and isolation" found particularly among the sick.

"In this way," the Pope said, "we will cooperate in combating the culture of individualism, indifference and waste, and enable the growth of a culture of tenderness and compassion."


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VATICAN CITY – The "first therapy" that must be offered to the sick, and to the world, is a dose of closeness, friendship and love, Pope Francis said in his message for the World Day of the Sick.

"We came into the world because someone welcomed us; we were made for love; and we are called to communion and fraternity," he wrote in his message for the annual observance Feb. 11, the feast of Our Lady of Lourdes.

A connection with other people "is what sustains us, above all at times of illness and vulnerability," the 87-year-old Pope wrote. "It is also the first therapy that we must all adopt in order to heal the diseases of the society in which we live."

The theme chosen for the 2024 observance is from the Book of Genesis, "It is not good that man should be alone." It was subtitled, "Healing the Sick by Healing Relationships."  

In his message, released Jan. 13, Pope Francis said Christians believe that "from the beginning, God, who is love, created us for communion and endowed us with an innate capacity to enter into relationship with others."

"We were created to be together, not alone," he wrote. "Precisely because this project of communion is so deeply rooted in the human heart, we see the experience of abandonment and solitude as something frightening, painful and even inhuman."

Pope Francis recalled the horrible pain of loneliness endured by those who were sick or in nursing homes during the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic and had no contact with their loved ones.

"I share too in the pain, suffering and isolation felt by those who, because of war and its tragic consequences, are left without support and assistance," he said. "War is the most terrible of social diseases, and it takes its greatest toll on those who are most vulnerable."

But even in rich countries at peace, he said, "old age and sickness are frequently experienced in solitude and, at times, even in abandonment."

When a culture emphasizes the individual, "exalts productivity at all costs, cultivates the myth of efficiency," he said, it "proves indifferent, even callous, when individuals no longer have the strength needed to keep pace."

"It then becomes a throwaway culture, in which 'persons are no longer seen as a paramount value to be cared for and respected, especially when they are poor or disabled, 'not yet useful' –like the unborn – or 'no longer needed' – like the elderly,'" he said, quoting his encyclical "Fratelli Tutti, on Fraternity and Social Friendship."

The Pope said such thinking is reflected in "certain political decisions that are not focused on the dignity of the human person and his or her needs, and do not always promote the strategies and resources needed to ensure that every human being enjoys the fundamental right to health and access to healthcare."

But, he said, the human dignity of sick and vulnerable also is abandoned when health care is seen simply as the provision of procedures and medication, rather than as caring for the whole person and involving the family in creating a network of support.

"Brothers and sisters," he wrote, "the first form of care needed in any illness is compassionate and loving closeness. To care for the sick thus means above all to care for their relationships, all of them: with God, with others – family members, friends, health care workers – with creation and with themselves."

Addressing those who are ill, Pope Francis said: "Do not be ashamed of your longing for closeness and tenderness! Do not conceal it, and never think that you are a burden on others."

And he called on all Catholics, "with the love for one another that Christ the Lord bestows on us in prayer, especially in the Eucharist," to "tend to the wounds of solitude and isolation" found particularly among the sick.

"In this way," the Pope said, "we will cooperate in combating the culture of individualism, indifference and waste, and enable the growth of a culture of tenderness and compassion."

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